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qwe 4 лет назад 0 байт Pin It! Share this page Share Facebook Twitter A view of Bourbon Street in the early morning, New Orleans A view of Bourbon Street in the early morning (John Moore/Getty) HIDE CAPTION A view of Bourbon Street in the early morning (John Moore/Getty) Left Right Expand A view of Bourbon Street in the early morning, New Orleans Cocktails at Bellocq, New Orleans Doorman and musician Skip Thompson keeps watch on Bourbon Street, New Orleans Jean Lafitte’s Old Absinthe House, New Orleans Jean Lafitte’s Old Absinthe House, New Orleans Catching beads on Bourbon Street, New Orleans Left Right Order a sazerac in New Orleans and a well-meaning local will likely tell you how the city’s official cocktail is also the world’s first. It’s not true, of course – the word “cocktail”, originally referring to a mixture of liquor, sugar, water and bitters, was used long before the sazerac’s 19th-century creation. But don’t tell New Orleans residents that, for whom the drink is a serious point of pride: virtually any bartender in New Orleans can mix the drink without even glancing at a recipe. “Even before we knew about cocktail culture, we were making sazeracs at friends’ house parties,” said Kirk Estopinal, owner of New Orleans cocktail bar Bellocq. Typically made with rye whiskey, a couple dashes of Peychaud’s bitters, an absinthe or herbsaint rinse, simple syrup or a muddled sugar cube and a lemon twist, the sazerac is an amalgamation of flavours just as New Orleans is an amalgamation of cultures, like French, Creole and Cajun. And just as the city has changed over time, so has the sazerac. Related video: The sandwich that made the Big Easy The drink originally got its name from a brand of French cognac named Sazerac-de-Forge et Fils. According to legend, sometime in the mid-19th Century, an establishment called the Sazerac House (until then known as the Merchant’s Coffee Exchange) mixed the cognac with sugar and Peychaud’s bitters – the purported cure-all of local pharmacist Antoine Amédée Peychaud – and the sazerac cocktail was born. But in the late 1800s, a phylloxera epidemic devastated the French grapes used to make cognac, making the spirit incredibly hard to find. Around the same time, it’s said that locals began to prefer rye whisky, replacing cognac as the sazerac’s base ingredient. Absinthe’s popularity also had begun to skyrocket, so a rinse of the herbal, anis-flavoured spirit found its way into the glass. In 1949, the Sazerac House moved into the Roosevelt Hotel and became the Sazerac Bar. After Hurricane Katrina forced it to close in 2005, the hotel reopened in 2009, completely renovated with a long walnut bar, elegant tile floor and white coat-wearing wait staff, nodding to the former opulence of old New Orleans. Today, it remains one of the city’s most iconic places to sample the classic drink. Pin It! Share this page Share Facebook Twitter A view of Bourbon Street in the early morning, New Orleans A view of Bourbon Street in the early morning (John Moore/Getty) HIDE CAPTION A view of Bourbon Street in the early morning (John Moore/Getty) Left Right Expand A view of Bourbon Street in the early morning, New Orleans Cocktails at Bellocq, New Orleans Doorman and musician Skip Thompson keeps watch on Bourbon Street, New Orleans Jean Lafitte’s Old Absinthe House, New Orleans Jean Lafitte’s Old Absinthe House, New Orleans Catching beads on Bourbon Street, New Orleans Left Right Order a sazerac in New Orleans and a well-meaning local will likely tell you how the city’s official cocktail is also the world’s first. It’s not true, of course – the word “cocktail”, originally referring to a mixture of liquor, sugar, water and bitters, was used long before the sazerac’s 19th-century creation. But don’t tell New Orleans residents that, for whom the drink is a serious point of pride: virtually any bartender in New Orleans can mix the drink without even glancing at a recipe. “Even before we knew about cocktail culture, we were making sazeracs at friends’ house parties,” said Kirk Estopinal, owner of New Orleans cocktail bar Bellocq. Typically made with rye whiskey, a couple dashes of Peychaud’s bitters, an absinthe or herbsaint rinse, simple syrup or a muddled sugar cube and a lemon twist, the sazerac is an amalgamation of flavours just as New Orleans is an amalgamation of cultures, like French, Creole and Cajun. And just as the city has changed over time, so has the sazerac. Related video: The sandwich that made the Big Easy The drink originally got its name from a brand of French cognac named Sazerac-de-Forge et Fils. According to legend, sometime in the mid-19th Century, an establishment called the Sazerac House (until then known as the Merchant’s Coffee Exchange) mixed the cognac with sugar and Peychaud’s bitters – the purported cure-all of local pharmacist Antoine Amédée Peychaud – and the sazerac cocktail was born. But in the late 1800s, a phylloxera epidemic devastated the French grapes used to make cognac, making the spirit incredibly hard to find. Around the same time, it’s said that locals began to prefer rye whisky, replacing cognac as the sazerac’s base ingredient. Absinthe’s popularity also had begun to skyrocket, so a rinse of the herbal, anis-flavoured spirit found its way into the glass. In 1949, the Sazerac House moved into the Roosevelt Hotel and became the Sazerac Bar. After Hurricane Katrina forced it to close in 2005, the hotel reopened in 2009, completely renovated with a long walnut bar, elegant tile floor and white coat-wearing wait staff, nodding to the former opulence of old New Orleans. Today, it remains one of the city’s most iconic places to sample the classic drink.
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